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Gair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf is a New York Plaintiff's personal injury law firm specializing in automobile accidents, construction accidents, medical malpractice, products liability, police misconduct and all types of New York personal injury litigation.
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New software will allow the NYC DOT to verify if construction workers have completed their safety training

construction site NYTo reduce injuries and deaths on NYC construction sites, Mayor de Blasio signed Local Law 196 in 2017. This law requires that workers can only be allowed to work on a  construction site in the city if they  attended a minimum amount of hours of safety training.

Construction superintendents, Site safety managers and site safety coordinators are all required to have  62 hours of safety training that includes the regular OSHA 30-hour safety class and additionally 8-hour fall prevention training, 8-hour on chapter 33 that covers safeguard during construction and demolition work, 4-hour scaffold safety, 2-hour site safety, 2-hour tool box talks, 2-hour safety meetings organization and preparation, 2-hour general electives, 2-hour specialized electives and 2-hour drug and alcohol awareness.

Other construction workers are required to attend the OSHA 30-hour safety class or the OSHA 10-hour class with 20 hours of additional training consisting of 8 hours of fall prevention training, 4 hours of scaffolding safety training and the option to choose between 8 hours of Chapter 33 training,  4 hours of general electives or 4 hours of specialized effectives.

Non compliant construction site permit holders will be charged up to $5000 per untrained worker.

In order to facilitate inspections and make sure every worker is trained, the DOT recently signed a contract with my Comply, a tech company that facilitates the verification of safety credentials

All construction workers in the city will now be required to carry a myComply smartbadge programmed to a database. The badge comes in the form of a sticker that workers can wear on their helmet. The badge will be scanned when the worker enters the construction site. If the worker’s safety credentials are not up to date, the worker will not be able to access the site.

Workers have until March 1st to pick up their badges. After all badges will be picked up, MyCmply will work with the DOT to build the database and prepare the software. When everything will be set up, DOT inspectors visiting a site will have access to the database and be able to check quickly if all workers are compliant.

Read more in Construction Dive