Gair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf is a New York Plaintiff's personal injury law firm specializing in automobile accidents, construction accidents, medical malpractice, products liability, police misconduct and all types of New York personal injury litigation.

Articles Posted in Trial Advocacy

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ben%20small.jpgIn their Trial Advocacy column, New York Personal Injury Attorneys Ben Rubinowitz from Gair Gair Conason Steigman Mackauf Bloom and Rubinowitz and Evan Torgan from Torgan & Cooper write: Conducting an effective direct examination of an economist presents several challenges, such as maintaining the jury’s attention through the presentation of relatively dry subject matter, and conveying the complicated financial terms and calculations to lay jurors in a language that they can understand.

Read more in the New York Law Journal

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Our partner, New York Construction Accident Attorney Chris Sallay was the chair of the Litigating Construction Site Accidents NYC 2014 seminar presented by the New York State Bar Association last Friday . In this video Chris Sallay provides tips and demonstrates how to present an opening statement in a New York Construction Accident case.
To learn more about New York Construction Accident Law click here)

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=P46y1a_5Mu4

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r_steigman_small.jpgOur partner, NY Personal Injury Attorney Richard M. Steigman, will be the Chair of the “2014 CPLR Update: Learn the Cutting-Edge Decisions Every Litigator Must Know” Seminar presented by the New York State Trial Lawyers Association on March 25th 2014 from 6:00 to 9:00 pm. Hon. Ariel E. Belen (Ret) will also be on the faculty.

One of the key requirements of successfully managing a civil caseload is staying abreast of legislative changes and court decisions in the field of New York Civil Practice. This seminar will provide an in-depth review of these new developments, including practice tips and pitfall warnings that are invaluable for the civil litigator with perspectives from both the practitioner and the bench.

Topics will include:

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BR.jpgIn their Trial Advocacy column, New York Personal Injury Lawyers Ben Rubinowitz of Gair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf and Evan Torgan of Torgan & Cooper write: The rhetorical question is an effective and persuasive tool for summation. It is subtle in its delivery and potent upon its receipt. When used properly, it can persuade a jury without the insult of a more heavy-handed approach. A seasoned and accomplished trial attorney has to ask, what could be better?

Following is the article

The art of persuasion comes in many forms. It is the manner in which the trial lawyer chooses to present certain facts that will serve as the driving force behind a successful outcome. Since every aspect of the trial should be conducted with an eye toward summation-toward creating the most powerful argument that can be advanced-the trial lawyer must be acutely aware of how each part of the trial will affect the summation.
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r_steigman_small.jpg By Richard M. Steigman;

Launched in 1965, Medicaid provides joint federal and state funding of medical care for individuals who cannot afford to pay their own medical costs. Although the Federal Government pays the majority of the costs incurred for patient care, under Federal Law, the states are tasked with administering the program.

One of the states’ obligations under Medicaid law is to seek reimbursement for payments for medical expenses from responsible third parties to the extent of such legal liability (42 U.S.C. § 1396[a][25][B]). To fulfill that mandate, New York enacted Social Services Law § 104-b, which gives the State Medicaid official the right to enforce a lien “for such amount as may be fixed by the public welfare officer not exceeding, however, the total amount of such assistance and care furnished by [Medicaid] on or after the date when such injuries occurred.”

This statute, like the ones enacted in other states, was interpreted as to allow Medicaid to assert a lien on a recovery up to the amount, regardless of the amount of the recovery which is properly allocable to Medicaid (see, e.g., Baker v. Sterling, 39 N.Y.2d 397, 384 N.Y.S.2d 128 [1976]). Put another way, under the interpretation used by Medicaid and backed by the Courts, if Medicaid had expended $200,000 for a plaintiff who suffers horrific personal injuries (and whose pain and suffering and loss of earnings claims would fairly be worth millions of dollars), but ultimately must settle a case for $250,000 due either to inadequate insurance, then Medicaid, in it is discretion, could assert a lien against the recovery up to the total amount of its expenditures. This is true irrespective of the fact that, had a finder of fact allocated the settlement among the different elements of damages, the amount properly allocable to Medicaid would, in fact, amount to a small fraction of its claimed lien.
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br.jpgIn their Trial Advocacy column in the New York Law Journal, Personal Injury Attorneys Ben Rubinowitz of Gair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf, and Evan Torgan of Torgan & Cooper, write about the importance of cross-examining experts on collateral matters.

When dealing with the expert witness, exposing bias is not only an essential part of cross, but one that becomes imperative if counsel is to turn the jury against the so-called “expert.” This article offers an informative approach and “how to guide” to cross examine the expert by using the “collateral attack.” The examples used in this article are taken from a recent case that Rubinowitz tried in which he secured a $7.25 million verdict for his client who suffered knee injuries.

For more than 10 years Ben Rubinowitz and Evan Torgan have been recognized by the New York Law Journal as experts in their field. To date, they have written more than 60 articles on various aspects of trial advocacy.

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br.jpgIn their Trial Advocacy column in the New York Law Journal, Personal Injury Attorneys Ben Rubinowitz of Gair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf, and Evan Torgan of Torgan & Cooper, write: Just as defendants use surreptitious video-recording in an attempt to capture images of unsuspecting plaintiffs engaging in activities which they claim their injuries restrict, in fairness, plaintiffs should be afforded the same opportunity when it comes to challenging the weight of the opinions offered by defendants’ examining doctors at trial.

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Our partner Anthony Gair was invited by the New York State Bar Association to speak at their seminar LITIGATING THE PRODUCTS LIABILITY CASE: LAW AND PRACTICE in New York City on October 24th.

This is a video from his presentation. If you would like to see the complete program (with different speakers) a live webcast option will be available on Friday November 1st 2013 for the Albany Program. Click here for more info.

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Jeffrey%20Bloom.jpgOur partner, Jeffrey Bloom, will be speaking tomorrow at the “Mt. Sinai Update 2013: Breast Imaging” program. This program is designed to cover clinical aspects of breast imaging including digital mammography, breast ultrasound, breast MRI, and interventional procedures, as well as medicolegal issues. The faculty consists of twelve nationally and internationally recognized experts. Jeffrey Bloom will be speaking on the subject of Breast Imaging Malpractice and provide a Plaintiff’ Attorney’s Perspective. The complete Agenda can be found here.

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nycbarlogo.jpgOur managing partner, Ben Rubinowitz will be a speaker at the New York City Bar ProgramAnatomy of a Trial: Tips and Strategy to win your Case on Thursday November 14th from 6:00pm to 9:00 pm . The program is co-chaired by United States Magistrate Judge, SDNY Honorable, Sarah Netburn and New York Trial Attorney Philip R. Schatz, founding partner at Wrobel Schatz & Fox LLP

Taught by leading trial advocates and experienced judges, this event will provide you with the basics of a federal trial, from voir dire to verdict, and share their “how-to” tips and tricks for victory in the courtroom. You’ll learn:

  • How To Create Successful Opening And Closing Arguments