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Gair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf is a New York Plaintiff's personal injury law firm specializing in automobile accidents, construction accidents, medical malpractice, products liability, police misconduct and all types of New York personal injury litigation.

Articles Tagged with explosion

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hoverboardA 3 year old girl died from her injury after a hoverboard explosion caused a major fire in her apartment in Harrisburg, PA, last Friday night. The hoverboard battery was charging at the time of the explosion.  The girl fell from the second story of her home as she was trying to escape the blaze that was ravaging her apartment. Her two sisters suffered critical burn injuries and her dad as well as a teenage boy who was in the house at the time of the accident, were treated for smoke inhalation. Dennis Voe, a 21 year old  firefighter who was en route to the fire was struck by a car and died from his injury as well.

It is the first time that a hoverboard explosion is directly linked to a fatality. The accident prompted a federal investigation. Previously the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) investigated multiple cases of burn injuries related to defective hoverboards. So far investigations have led to the recall of approximately half a million hoverboards with defective battery packs. At least 8 models manufactured in China with defective lithium battery packs were part of the defective models recalled. Despite the many fires and injuries caused by exploding hoverboards many families still buy them and use them.

If you or your children own one of them, you can check the list of the hoverboards recalled by CPSC. However, please remember that owning a hoverboard that is not on the list is not a guarantee that the battery may not be prone to fire hazard.  Do not charge your hoverboard at night when you sleep but during the day in a location where you can keep an eye on it and where there is an extinguisher nearby.

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hoverboardCases of defective hoverboards busting into flames or exploding all over the world have prompted the National Fire Marshall Organization to issue a warning about the safety risks related to these fashionable products. A similar warning was also issued by the UK’s National Trading Standard after 88% of the products they tested posed a risk of catching fire.  In New York, these self balanced scooters have been declared illegal and users risk a fine of $200 if they are caught by the police riding them.

Because hoverboards are in high demand this holiday season, negligent manufacturers have been flooding the market with shoddy versions of the toy that have a high risk of catching fire. Explosions often happen during charging time and are caused by defective lithium batteries but cases of hoverboards catching fire during rides have also been reported.  In Louisiana an exploding hoverboard led to a fire that completely destroyed a house (see video below).

Read more in the NY Daily News

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A Boltbus that departed from New York to go to Boston exploded on the Massachusetts Turnpike yesterday during rush hours.  The bus driver noticed smoke coming out of the bus, pulled over and immediately evacuated the 47 passengers with their belongings. Shortly after the bus exploded and caught fire. The recasons of the explosion are still being investigated.

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The catastrophic explosion that happened in New York yesterday may have been caused by negligence and may have been prevented. Mayor de Blasio said the first warning came 17 minutes before the explosions but Harlem residents say that the mayor’s statement is inaccurate. According to them a strong gas odor had been persisting for months and even though there were numerous complaints little had been done about it. Since last fall residents have been calling 311 to complain about the gas odor. Around Christmas time a FDNY officer visited the premises and reassured tenants that everything was fine… Obviously we know today it wasn’t.

Read more in the New York Daily News

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Last April the explosion at a fertilizer plant in West Texas was of the magnitude of a small earthquake. It killed 15, destroyed houses, businesses and municipal buildings, and left a 93-foot crater. To avoid such a tragedy in the future, President Obama last week signed an executive order directing Federal agencies to work with stakeholders to improve chemical safety and security.
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When OSHA inspectors visited RWS, a plant that makes wood shavings for animal bedding, they found explosive combustible shavings all over the equipment and the floor with accumulation reaching as high as one foot in some areas. Adding to that employees were authorized to smoke in locations where excessive wood dust and wood shavings created a high risk of fire.

RWS Manufacturing plant in Queensbury, NY,deliberately, seriously and repeatedly violated worker safety and health standards and is now facing $233,870 in fines by OSHA.

Since its opening in Quennsburry, NY, 5 years ago, RWS Manufacturing plant has been the objects of multiple complaints by neighbors. It also has a long history of issues with the town’s enforcement codes related to noise, smoke and lack of groundwater control.