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Gair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf is a New York Plaintiff's personal injury law firm specializing in automobile accidents, construction accidents, medical malpractice, products liability, police misconduct and all types of New York personal injury litigation.

Articles Posted in Medical Malpractice

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FAILURE TO PROPERLY TREAT EXTRAVASATION OF DOXORUBICIN (Adriamycin)

By: Anthony H. Gair;

New York medical malpractice attorney elaborates on the extravasation of intravenously administered chemotherapeutic agents into the subcutaneous tissue of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy is a known risk of treatment. The potential gravity of injury caused by extravasation is dependent upon the type of drug which extravasates. The most destructive extravasation injuries are those caused by anti-tumor drugs which bind to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), such as Doxorubicin, (Adriamycin) which has been a primary part of chemotherapeutic regimes since the late 1960’s. Extravasation of chemotherapeutic agents which bind to nucleic acids can lead to a prolonged course of injury. The most clinical experience has been derived from the extravasation of Doxorubicin. Rudolph, R, Larson, D. Etiology and Treatment of Chemotherapeutic Agent Extravasation Injuries: A Review. J. Clin. Oncol, 1987; 5:1116-1126. Doxorubicin causes severe progressive tissue necrosis that may involve muscles and tendons. Since no specific antidote has been developed, the recommended treatment of Doxorubicin extravasation is early excission of all infiltrated tissue. Dahlstrom, KK, Chenoufi, HL, Daujard, S. Fluorescene microscopic demonstration and demarcation of Doxorubicin extravasation. Experimental and Clinical studies. Cancer, 1990 Apr. 15; 65(8): 1722-1726.

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A Study To End the Frivolous Malpractice Lawsuit Myth

This article written by our partner Jeffrey B. Bloom in 2006 is just as relevant today as it was then.

“Last week, within days of the U.S. Senate performing its annual rite of taking up and then denying cloture to a bill to limit the rights of medical malpractice victims and cap damages in medical malpractice cases, a study was released which clearly demonstrates that our current tort system is working quite well in ensuring that the vast majority of cases are valid claims and that frivolous or non-meritorious malpractice cases are rarely brought and hardly ever result in damages being unjustly paid.

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By Anthony H. Gair, Gair Gair Conason Steigman Mackauf Bloom&Rubinowitz

The popliteal artery is the major source of blood supply to the lower leg. The femoral artery becomes the popliteal artery as it passes through the hiatus of the adductor magnus muscle and enters the popliteal fossa. It generally ends at the inferior border of the popliteus muscle where it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries. It lies directly behind the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus.1 Injuries to the popliteal artery during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction or arthroscopic meniscectomy are extremely rare.2 The popliteal artery is closely related to the posterior capsule of the knee joint, being separated from it only by a small amount of fat. The artery also kinks forward when the knee is flexed, placing it close to the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. It is thus imperative that surgery in the posterior aspects of the knee is performed under direct visualization. If an arterial injury is suspected following surgery of the knee an opinion from a vascular surgeon should be sought urgently.

As a New York medical malpractice attorney we understand the delayed recognition of a popliteal artery lesion is a major cause of amputation of the affected extremity. Further, true spasm of the popliteal artery is rare. It is thus dangerous to diagnose arterial spasms since in reality thrombosis is usually present. It is further, axiomatic that the absence of pulses in an extremity is due to arterial injury until proven otherwise. Additionally, compartment syndrome may accompany vascular injury secondary to prolonged ischemia, venous injury or partial laceration to the artery with bleeding into the compartments.