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Articles Tagged with teen car accident

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teen driverRecent statistics show that 41% of teen drivers who died in car accidents were intoxicated. While drunk driving has been declining, driving while impaired by other substances such as  weed, other illegal drugs, prescription and OTC medication has increased significantly. The National Teen Driver Safety Week that will kick off on October 18th will focus on this particular issue. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in association with the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia has developed material for schools and for parents to increase teen awareness about impaired driving.  Under the theme “Avoid the Regret – Avoid Impaired Driving” the campaign is seeking solutions to prevent teens deaths and injuries on the road.

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A 17 year old driver crashed his car into a SUV last night in New York City. The front passenger of the car died while the back passenger suffered personal injury . Both drivers were also injured. The teen was driving north on 231 St with two other teen passengers when he crashed into a SUV driven by a 20 year old man at 119th Av in Cambria Heights, Queens, NYC. Read more in the NY Daily News

In New York State, motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of unintentional deaths for teens. Every day an average of 12 people are killed or are hospitalized because of a collision caused by a teen driver. Newly licensed male teen drivers as well as their teen passengers are the most at risk of being killed or injured in a car accident with unsafe speed being the leading cause of teen crashes. See graph below of most recent New York State statistics.

NY car accidents stats

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Teen drivingParents can play a big role in helping their children become safe drivers and avoid being injured or killed in a car accident. Thursday April 28th at 1:00 PM CST, the National Safety Council is organizing a webinar during which Jessica Mirman, PhD, a behavioral scientist and researcher on the Center for Injury Research and Prevention HOP’s Teen Driver Safety Research team, will share her recent research on the effectiveness of TeenDrivingPlan, a prototype interactive web-based application to help parents more effectively supervise driving practice. Another speaker Kathy Bernstein, senior manager of Teen Driving Initiatives for the National Safety Council, will talk about DriveitHome– a new resource from the National Safety Council designed to support parents of newly licensed teens. Read more here

 

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84 year old Ignascio Andal was crossing the street when he was struck by a car driven by a 17 year old driver. The accident happened on Wicklow Place in Jamaica Estates, Queens, NYC, yesterday afternoon. The elderly man who lived just a few blocks away died from his injuries at the hospital. The car driver wasn’t charged.

Read more in the NY Daily News

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In order to prevent teen car crashes and personal injury, an innovative online program focuses on improving frontal lobe execution functions such as self-regulation or impulse control so that young drivers can achieve insight about driving risks and improve their driving skills.

The frontal lobe of the brain is not fully developed until the age of 25 and young drivers need specific help. With this concept in mind, Dr Robert Isler, PhD, an associate professor of Psychology at The University of Waikato in New Zealand, created eDrive, an online interactive driver training program that takes drivers on a trip through New Zealand while teaching them specific driving skills.

Read more about it in this interesting blog from Flaura Koplin Winston, MD, PhD from the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.