Gair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf is a New York Plaintiff's personal injury law firm specializing in automobile accidents, construction accidents, medical malpractice, products liability, police misconduct and all types of New York personal injury litigation.

Articles Tagged with pedestrian accident nyc

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The intersection where the unlicensed driver killed ChristianFourteen-year-old Christian Antoine was struck and killed by the reckless actions of an unlicensed and speeding driver last Saturday evening in Brooklyn, NYC. The accident occurred at the intersection of Glenwood Rd. and E. 81st St. in Canarsie.

Christian was more than just a statistic in the rising toll of pedestrian fatalities; he was a young boy with dreams, a loving family, and a future that was unjustly cut short. According to reports, 45-year-old Rayan Salmon, driving a 2018 Mercedes SUV at an unsafe speed, caused a chain-reaction crash that ultimately led to Christian’s untimely death. This incident is a reminder of the catastrophic consequences of negligent driving and the critical need for stringent enforcement of traffic laws.

As pedestrian accident lawyers in NYC, we have seen the aftermath of such tragedies unfold too many times. Families are left to navigate their grief while grappling with the legal complexities of seeking justice for their loved ones. In Christian’s case, the charges against Salmon for aggravated unlicensed operation underscore the severe risks unlicensed drivers pose to public safety. However, these charges are just the beginning of a long legal journey for Christian’s family to seek accountability and compensation for their loss.

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Queens Boulevard, once notoriously dubbed “the Boulevard of Death,” has seen a remarkable turnaround. In 1997, this street was a pedestrian nightmare, claiming 18 lives. However, since Vision Zero’s implementation in 2014, fatalities have drastically reduced, with some years witnessing zero deaths.

ThAtlantic Avenueis transformation didn’t happen by chance. It was the result of a concerted effort by the city, involving adjustments in pedestrian signal timings, road safety improvements, and the introduction of bike lanes. These measures not only enhanced safety but also fostered a more pedestrian and cyclist-friendly environment.

However, Atlantic Avenue tells a different story. Despite being another major NYC artery, it hasn’t received the same level of attention or intervention. The result is alarming: in the last decade, Atlantic Avenue has witnessed 40 traffic deaths, a number four times higher than that of Queens Boulevard. This stark contrast exemplifies the uneven application of Vision Zero across the city.

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Bronx location of the fatal hit and run accidentLourdes Camilo, a Bronx resident, was fatally injured in a hit-and-run accident at the intersection of Melrose Avenue and East 156th Street. This incident underscores the importance of road safety and the consequences of traffic law violations. It also reflects on the necessity for enhanced pedestrian protection measures.

The involvement of two vehicles – a white SUV that fled and a green Jeep Cherokee that stayed – brings forth different legal considerations.

1. Liability in Hit-and-Run: The driver of the white SUV, who left the scene, is subject to significant legal ramifications under New York law. Fleeing the scene of an accident, particularly one involving fatality, is a criminal offense.

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the intersection where the reckless driver killed the pedestrianXiaohong Chen, a 52-year-old pedestrian, was tragically struck and killed by a Dodge Ram pickup truck in Dyker Heights.

The driver, known for a long history of speeding and recklessness, as indicated by the numerous speed camera violations, made an illegal turn, leading to this fatal incident. Despite the driver’s alarming record and the presence of a vanity plate that ironically reads ‘NDRTAKER’, no immediate charges were filed (read more in Streetblog about the reckless driver).

Legal Perspective:

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Parking spaces close to intersections can be dangerous to pedestriansMayor Eric Adams’ recent announcement to remove parking spots from 1,000 New York City intersections annually represents a significant stride towards enhancing pedestrian safety. This move, essential for protecting pedestrians from drivers, comes in the wake of several tragic traffic incidents, including the heart-wrenching losses of a 3-year-old boy in Queens and 7-year-old Kamari Hughes in Brooklyn.

As pedestrian accident attorneys, we see firsthand the aftermath of traffic accidents and understand the importance of proactive measures to prevent them. The “daylighting” initiative – the strategy behind this move – aims to improve driver visibility at intersections, thereby reducing the likelihood of accidents. It’s a commendable effort to prioritize pedestrian safety in urban planning.

Despite these efforts, New York City’s streets remain perilous. This year alone, over 225 traffic-related fatalities, including 82 pedestrians and 27 cyclists, have been reported. These numbers are not just statistics; they represent lives lost and families shattered.

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location of the car crash on 47th street and Queens BoulevardThe legal world frequently encounters instances of repeat offenders, individuals who, despite having faced the consequences of their actions, find themselves entangled with the law again. The story of Michael Moreno from Stormville, NY, is one such  reminder.

In October 2015, Gabriela Aguilar-Vallinos, a dedicated waitress, was fatally struck while cycling home from work. The individual behind the wheel, Michael Moreno, did not stop. After two weeks of silence, Moreno turned himself in to the authorities. His decision to wait meant that key evidence, such as alcohol involvement, was lost.

The court found Moreno guilty of criminally negligent homicide and leaving the scene of an accident. He was sentenced to six years in prison, providing some solace to Gabriela’s grieving family and the community.

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yearly pedestrian fatalities in New York CityA grandmother who was pushing her 2-year-old granddaughter in a stroller was fatally struck by the driver of a pickup truck who failed to yield to them. The pedestrian accident occurred yesterday afternoon around 1:00 p.m. at the intersection of Bay 25th Street and Bath Avenue in Brooklyn. The 56-year-old driver of the pick-up truck,  identified as Faheem Shabazz, was making a left turn when he struck the grandmother and her goddaughter. He remained at the accident scene and was later charged with failing to yield to a pedestrian. According to How’s my driving, the pick-up truck has a history of recklessness. In the last 9 months, the pick-up truck received 9 violations for a total of $850 in fines. 4 of them were school zone speed camera violations.

The 66-year-old grandmother was transported to the hospital in critical condition but she did not survive. Miraculously her granddaughter survived and was not injured.

In New York City,  the Right of Way or Failure to Yield Law was passed in May 2014 to reduce pedestrian fatalities. Under this law drivers who fail to yield to a pedestrian or a cyclist can be subjected to a fine of up to $150 and up to 15 days in jail.  While this law and other initiatives such as the lowering of the city speed limit and the installation of speed cameras in school zones have led to a decrease in pedestrian fatalities in the city, large vehicles driven by reckless drivers remain a significant danger for pedestrians. Last year 116 pedestrians died in car accidents in New York City and 8,500 of them were injured.  While these numbers are lower than in 2013, before Vision Zero,  when 168 pedestrians were killed and 11,978 were injured they are far from the “zero” fatality goal of the Vision Zero program.

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Multiple pedestrians and a cyclist where injured in a multiple-collision crash caused by the driver of a stolen car who was trying to escape the police near Grand Central Station

As car accident attorneys in New York City, we have witnessed numerous devastating cases resulting from reckless driving and accidents. However, one particular type of accident that stands out as particularly dangerous is police chases and we have handled many such cases with excellent results.

The recent incident that occurred on August 1, 2023, where ten people were injured during a police chase in one of the most busy areas of Manhattan, highlights the urgent need to address the hazards associated with these pursuits.

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When the total number of crash fatalities during the first semester of 2023 is lower than the previous years, one category of road users, the cyclists, had a record number of fatalities with 14 deaths. Pedestrian fatalities were lower than usual with 41 fatalities. The NYPD also recorded 31 driver fatalities and 16 passenger fatalities for the first semester of 2023.

After two years of an unusually high number of auto accident fatalities in New York City during the first six months of the year, the total number of crash fatalities for the first six months of 2023 was pretty much similar to the levels observed before the Covid19 crisis, oscillating around 100 for the first six months of the year. In 2023, 102 people died in crashes during the first semester compared to 113, 118, 92, 101, 84, 96, 107, 107, 97, and 121 during the semesters of 2022, 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, and 2013 respectively.

NYC car accident deaths by category June 2023
During the first semester of 2023, 24,535 people were injured in crashes. This number is slightly higher than the two previous years, during which 23,963 and 22,898 people were injured during the first semester of 2022 and 2021, respectively, but still lower than what it was before the pandemic when the number of traffic injuries for the first six months of the year was above 25,000. Among the category of road users, drivers were the most injured with 10,785 injured motor vehicle operators for the first semester, followed by passengers (7,564), pedestrians (4,098), and cyclists (2,088).

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Families for Safe Street fight to reduce car accidents in NYCNew York City has long been striving to make its streets safer for pedestrians and reduce the number of tragic accidents caused by speeding vehicles. A proposed law known as Sammy’s Law, named after a young child who lost his life to a speeding driver, has become a symbol of the urgent need for change. However, despite widespread support, the law has faced obstacles in the State Legislature. In a powerful display of their determination, advocates are planning a hunger strike to shed light on the importance of passing this life-saving bill. As car  accident lawyers in New York City, we believe it is crucial to discuss the significance of Sammy’s Law and the urgent need for its implementation.

Sammy’s Law is dedicated to Sammy Cohen Eckstein, a 12-year-old boy who tragically lost his life in 2013 when he was struck by a speeding van while retrieving a soccer ball in Park Slope, Brooklyn

Since Sammy’s death, an alarming number of 98 children have lost their lives in traffic collisions on the city’s streets, highlighting the pressing need for measures to improve safety. Amy Cohen, Sammy’s mother, along with others who have suffered the loss of loved ones in similar accidents, founded Families for Safe Streets, a group advocating for safer streets and stricter regulations.