Gair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf is a New York Plaintiff's personal injury law firm specializing in automobile accidents, construction accidents, medical malpractice, products liability, police misconduct and all types of New York personal injury litigation.

Articles Tagged with medical malpractice nyc

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Bronx Lebanon covering fro medical malpracticesNew York orthopedic surgeon Ira Kirshenbaum was sued 10 times for medical malpractice and 4 of his patients died after undergoing surgery with him. This hasn’t stop Bronx-Lebanon Hospital to keep him as the head of orthopedic surgery since 2008 and to pay him $1 million-a-year and additional bonuses since that time.

Bronx-Lebabanon treats mostly poor patients on Medicaid and executives seem more concerned by the hefty bonuses they receive every year than by patient care. Hospital executives don’t seem to be too concerned if patients die after surgery or if they come out of  the hospital with one leg shorter than the other.

When they hired Kirshenbaum, Bronx-Lebanon executives main concern was how much additional money they could put in their pocket.  By hiring Kirschenbaum the hospital would increase the number of hip and knee replacements which are very lucrative procedures.

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New York Medical Malpractice Lawyer Marijo AdimeyGair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf is proud to announce that our partner New York Medical Malpractice Lawyer Marijo C. Adimey obtained a $2.5 million unanimous verdict in an Upper Endoscopy case in Queens, New York.

The plaintiff, Elsa Garzon (57), went to Dr. Steven Batash on June 29, 2015 for a diagnostic EGD (also known as an upper endoscopy or esophagogastroduodenoscopy).  Ms. Garzon, of Columbian decent, emigrated to the United States in 2005 to provide a better life for her two children.  While raising her two small children, she learned English, became a resident, and started working as a helper in a local Queens deli.  She eventually became a U.S. Citizen and has continued to work at the same deli for over 12 years, where she is now the head cook.

Dr. Batash recommended an upper endoscopy, followed by a colonoscopy, to address her frequent complaints of abdominal pain.  An upper endoscopy is a screening and diagnostic tool used by gastroenterologists to evaluate the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract.  Upper endoscopy is used to identify ulcers, colon polyps, tumors, and areas of inflammation or bleeding.  Performed under a mild form of anesthesia, a thin, flexible tube with a camera at the tip is used to examine the inner lining of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum (part of the small intestine).  The scope is inserted into the mouth, down the esophagus, into the stomach and then passed through the upper part of the duodenum.   Passage of the endoscope through the duodenum is incredibly important, as improper handling of the scope could cause injury to intestine and to the abdominal cavity outside the intestine.

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medical malpracticeMedical Malpractice cases in New York are often very complex. Because the cases are too complex for a non-doctor to determine if the patients was the victim of a medical malpractice, the testimony of a medical expert is required for almost every medical malpractice case to go to the jury. However in some very rare cases in which the medical malpractice is “obvious”  medical expert testimony may not be necessary.

In a recent NYC medical malpractice case, a patient won his medical malpractice case without presenting  medical expert testimony. The patient sustained burns after his orthopedic surgeon inadvertently left a hot mallet on his left thigh and abdomen during an arthroscopic surgery. The patient sued the surgeon and his practice group for medical malpractice. After the surgeon admitted in his deposition that he had committed an error, the patient moved for partial summary judgment on the issue of liability. The surgeon submitted an affidavit that attempted to explain that despite his deposition, the operating room staff was ultimately responsible for the error. The court found the surgeon’s argument unavailing and partial summary judgement was granted to the plaintiff by the Bronx Supreme Court as to the surgeon only.

In Legakis v. New York Westchester Square Medical Center,et.el., 2016 NY Slip Op 07843, the Appellate Division, First Department, modified by also granting partial summary judgment on the issue of liability against the orthopedic surgeon’s practice group, and affirmed. The court held that the trial court did not err in granting partial summary judgment on the issue of liability against the orthopedic surgeon and partial summary judgment on the issue of liability should also be granted against the orthopedic surgeon’s practice group. The plaintiffs did not rely on res ipsa loquitur relying on the defendant’s deposition testimony and medical records. The Court held “…this is the rare case in which the ‘prima facie proof is so convincing that the inference of negligence arising therefrom is inescapable and unrebutted,’ so that summary judgment on liability is proper (Thomas v New York Univ. Med. Ctr., 283 AD2d 316, 317 [1st Dept 2001] [internal quotation marks omitted]).”

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New York Medical Malpractice Attorney Mariojo AdimeyOur firm is proud to announce that New York Medical Malpractice Lawyer Marijo C. Adimey obtained a $1.27 million verdict in a colonoscopy case in Brooklyn, New York City.

The plaintiff, Lola Heifetz (63), went to Dr. Robin Baradarian and The Brooklyn Gastroenterology and Endoscopy, PLLC on September 26, 2010 for a routine screening colonoscopy. Ms. Heifetz, of Ukraine descent, emigrated to the United States over thirty (30) years ago. She learned English, became a U.S. citizen, obtained her lab technician certificate, and started working as a lab technician at Maimonidies Medical Center. She worked at Maimonidies Medical Center for almost thirty (30) years until the day of the colonoscopy.

A colonoscopy is a screening and diagnostic tool used by gastroenterologists to evaluate the inside of the colon and identify ulcers, colon polyps, tumors, and areas of inflammation or bleeding. Performed under a mild form of anesthesia, a thin, flexible tube is used to examine the inner lining of the large intestine, i.e. the rectum and colon. The scope is inserted into the anus, through the rectum and then passed through the entire large intestine to the cecum. Passage of the colonoscope through the intestine is incredibly important, as improper handling of the scope could cause injury to not only the bowel itself, but vital organs outside the bowel including the spleen.